notes on diaspora

Race, Gender, Art, politics, migration & all things african diaspora

2 notes &

In her article “Researching Sex Work in the Caribbean” (Feminist Review, No. 67, Spring 2001, pp. 39-62), Kempadoo writes the following about European and North American women who engage in sex and romance tourism in the Caribbean:

Among women tourists, an experimentation with being able to control men, while retaining a sexualized femininity, appears to have taken place.  Caribbean masculinity and femininity, I concluded from this, could be viewed as the stage upon which a reshaping and retooling of western identity occurs, securing the reproduction of First World labor and the (re)contruction of First World/white/western masculinity and femininity.

It seems as if Kempadoo figures the tourist as necessarily white.  What about when the tourist is a black woman?

In her article “Researching Sex Work in the Caribbean” (Feminist Review, No. 67, Spring 2001, pp. 39-62), Kempadoo writes the following about European and North American women who engage in sex and romance tourism in the Caribbean:

Among women tourists, an experimentation with being able to control men, while retaining a sexualized femininity, appears to have taken place.  Caribbean masculinity and femininity, I concluded from this, could be viewed as the stage upon which a reshaping and retooling of western identity occurs, securing the reproduction of First World labor and the (re)contruction of First World/white/western masculinity and femininity.

It seems as if Kempadoo figures the tourist as necessarily white.  What about when the tourist is a black woman?

  1. notesondiaspora posted this